ICTlogy Lifestream http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/feed en-us http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss Sweetcron ictlogist@ictlogy.net Reptes de la participació institucional en un món d’organitzacions extrarepresentatives http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18671 Peña-López, I. (2014). Reptes de la participació institucional en un món d’organitzacions extrarepresentatives. Barcelona: We Question Our Project.

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Thu, 03 Sep 2015 18:56:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2883
Global Open Data Index http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18669 Ictlogist: Created page with "http://index.okfn.org/ <blockquote>The '''Global Open Data Index''' was created to answer these sorts of questions, providing an up-to-date and reliable guide to the state of..."

http://index.okfn.org/

<blockquote>The '''Global Open Data Index''' was created to answer these sorts of questions, providing an up-to-date and reliable guide to the state of global open data for policy-makers, researchers, journalists, activists and citizens.

The first initiative of its kind, the Global Open Data Index is regularly updated and provides the most comprehensive snapshot available of the global state of open data. The Index is underpinned by a detailed annual survey of the state of open data run by Open Knowledge in collaboration with open data experts and communities around the world.</blockquote>

[[Category:Data]] [[Category:Indices]] [[Category:Governance]] [[Category:Open_Data]] [[Category:Data_Governance]] [[Category:Indices_Governance]] [[Category:Open_Data_Indices]]

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Mon, 31 Aug 2015 01:41:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/wiki/index.php?title=Global_Open_Data_Index
Broken premises: Towards an intercultural understanding of bilateral co-operation in ICT for education in Burundi http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18670 Brunello, P. (2015). Broken premises: Towards an intercultural understanding of bilateral co-operation in ICT for education in Burundi. Egham: Royal Holloway University of London.

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Sun, 30 Aug 2015 19:55:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2882
A systematic review of open government data initiatives http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18668 Attard, J., Orlandi, F., Scerri, S. and; Auer, S. A systematic review of open government data initiatives. London: Elsevier.

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Sun, 30 Aug 2015 17:19:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2881
gitfs - Presslabs http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18667 Tue, 25 Aug 2015 02:44:00 -0700 http://www.presslabs.com/gitfs/ Communication. Mapping agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18666 My colleague Ricard Espelt is these days at the XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress, in Aberdeen, Scotland. The motto of this year’s edition of the congress is Places of possibility? Rural societies in a neoliberal world and this is just what Ricard is presenting on behalf of a small team he put up to analyse and map agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona. The communication he just presented, Mapping agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona, is but a part of a major research project that Ricard is doing and that I have the luck to be a part of. Following can be found the abstract, slides and downloads of our communication, signed together by Ricard Espelt, Pere Losantos, Enrique Rodríguez, Toni Martín, Francesc Pons and myself. Mind that it is only a short paper and, thus, only a small part of the information produced is available. Comments (and/or requests) will definitely be welcome. Abstract “Consumption groups” (or “consumption cooperatives”) is one of the types of short circuits of food consumption. They are organized to create an alternative to the dominant model, the agro-food big chain. Breaking the barriers between consumers and producers, this model of organization strengthens the possibility of stimulating social and economic local development. In this article, we show how consumption groups take advantage of the traditional cooperative move-ment rooted in the XIXth century, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the context of Barcelona. We analyse how the Social and Solidary Economy (SSE) measurement indicators are achieved by agro-food consumption groups, the nature of the networks made up by consumers and producers and the rele-vance of ICTs to maintain the business activity. Using geolocalized data and social network analysis we highlight the significance of local economical connec-tions among the actors involved. Even though consumption groups stimulate local business and correlate with SSE indicators, they are not represented in the design of public policies. This article wants to draw a different point of view in the promotion of alternative food futures as emerging social and economic actors, and the public policies to promote them. Slides

Dowloads

Short paper: Espelt, R., Peña-López, I., Losantos, P., Rodríguez, E., Martín, T. & Pons, F. (2015). “Mapping agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona”. In Places of possibility? Rural societies in a neoliberal world. Proceedings of the XXVI ESRS Congress, Aberdeen, Scotland, 2015. Aberdeen: The James Hutton Institute

Slides: Espelt, R., Peña-López, I., Losantos, P., Rodríguez, E., Martín, T. & Pons, F. (2015). “Mapping agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona”. In Places of possibility? Rural societies in a neoliberal world. Proceedings of the XXVI ESRS Congress, Aberdeen, Scotland, 2015. Aberdeen: The James Hutton Institute

This post originally published at ICT4D Blog as Communication. Mapping agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona

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Wed, 19 Aug 2015 09:00:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/20150819-communication-mapping-agro-food-consumption-groups-in-the-city-of-barcelona/
Places of possibility? Rural societies in a neoliberal world http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18664 Places of possibility? Rural societies in a neoliberal world. (2015). Aberdeen: The James Hutton Institute.

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Tue, 18 Aug 2015 23:49:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2880
Mapping agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18665 Espelt, R., Peña-López, I., Losantos, P., Rodríguez, E., Martín, T. and; Pons, F. (2015). Mapping agro-food consumption groups in the city of Barcelona. Aberdeen

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Tue, 18 Aug 2015 23:42:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2879
Six Models for the Internet + Politics http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18662 Fung, A., Gilman, H.R. and; Shkabatur, J. (2013). Six Models for the Internet + Politics. Indianapolis: Wiley Periodicals.

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Thu, 06 Aug 2015 19:05:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2878
International Studies Review http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18663 International Studies Review. Indianapolis: Wiley Periodicals.

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Thu, 06 Aug 2015 19:02:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2877
Political Polarisation and Network Leaderships in the Catalan Parliamentarians’ Twitter Network http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18644 Borge, R. and; Esteve del Valle, M. (2015). Political Polarisation and Network Leaderships in the Catalan Parliamentarians’ Twitter Network. Barcelona: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.

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Thu, 06 Aug 2015 17:59:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2876
Emancipation and the failure of the Sustainable Development Goals http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18643 Tim Unwin has written a terrific critical article on the Sustainable Development Goals (PDF) entitled ICTs and the failure of the Sustainable Development Goals. As can be inferred from its title, the main criticism — which I fully share — is about the almost total oblivion in what relates to Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), and some other issues concerning the design itself of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), how poverty is defined (and how development and the Economy are defined too), how the United Nations System works. I want to borrow Tim Unwin’s title to go a little bit further on his analysis. In my opinion, the problem is not (only) a total disdain for ICTs and all their potential in enabling, articulating, fostering or multiplying any other initiative against poverty or for sustainable development. The problem, I believe, is that this disdain for ICTs is just a symptom of the real, direst problem: a total disdain for emancipation. There is only one goal out of 17 that deals, in general, about peace, freedom, rights and the government: Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. When one drills down to the 12 targets and sub-goals, some of them are clearly what one would expect to see under the general goal. Some of them are mixed. And some others make one rethink about the previous ones. Indeed, an accurate reading of Goal 16 and its 12 targets and sub-goals raises a shadow of suspicion: is it about people that Goal 16 is talking about, or is it talking about maintaining things in order so that everything (the economy, trade) runs smoothly? Paranoid?

Sub-goal 16.a reads Strengthen relevant national institutions […] to prevent violence and combat terrorism and crime. That is, strengthening institutions is not a matter of peace, equality, progress… but to combat terrorism, which is what richest countries care about: their own safetey. Sub-goal 16.b reads Promote and enforce non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development. That is, the problem with discrimination is… development. Sustainable development. It is true: it is known that inequality damages economic growth. But one would expect that the direct goal would be inequality itself, and that the indirect one would be growth. Not the other way round.

After that, as it was said before, one becomes suspicious about some well phrased goals that, under a new paranoid light, can be read with different meanings. Such as target 16.3, which speaks of the rule of law: is it really to achieve justice for all, or is the rule of law good in itself at the national and international levels (which is were trade happens)? Now, on a more serious note, I think there are at least three big omissions in the way the Sustainable Development Goals are stated that are compatible with a vision that

The Sustainable Development Goals are especially about economic development, and not about individual and social development. The Sustainable Development Goals are especially about institutional development, and not about personal emancipation.

And these three issues that are omitted in the SDGs are, again in my opinion, closely related with the potential that ICTs can deploy if thoroughly applied. I’d dare say even more: if ICTs have any role in development, I believe that it is in the three following issues. It is not surprising, thus, that ICTs and our three issues are all missing in the 16 Sustainable Development Goals. Issues are:

Freedom, civil rights, citizen rights, political freedoms, freedom rights… many names for the very same concept. Freedom — or free — is mostly missing in the SDGs. It is only explicitly referred in target 16.10, and mixed up with public access to information… in accordance with national legislation. Well, according to Freedom House’s Freedom in the World 2015, 54% of the countries surveyed were partly free or not free… in accordance with their respective national legislations. Freedom is simply not a seriously taken issue in the SDGs. Empowerment is a step beyond freedom. If freedom is about the lack of constraints to think or do one’s own will, empowerment is about strengthening the capability to think or do that will of one’s own. Not only can you do whatever you want within the system, but you will be helped to. Again, empowerment, or capabilities, are widely mentioned in the formalities of the declaration, but are limited to gender and inequalities. This is quite a bit, for sure, but it is not enough. There is no way that development can be sustainable if it is not endogenous, and there is no way for endogenous development without empowerment. In my opinion, empowerment is paramount to development. Only one step below governance. Governance, democracy, political participation, deliberation, co-decision. If freedom is do one’s own will, and empowerment is doing it with multiplied strength, governance is way above that: it is not thought and action within the system, but over the system. Governance is shaping the system to one’s needs (or the collective needs, more appropriately), instead of shaping one-self to the system. This is why it is so important… and so surprisingly missing from the SDGs. Yes, decision-making is in there, but always as a way to have a certain influence on institutions. But no words on changing institutions, on transforming them, substituting them by other ones, or even getting rid of them.

And, as I see it, increased freedom, empowerment and governance are the biggest potential outcomes of ICTs for development. When Tim Unwin says he misses ICTs in the Sustainable Development Goals, not only I agree, but wonder whether the SDGs are also missing what I believe are the main reasons to apply ICTs for sustainable development, for instance: ICTs applied to Health increase one’s own degree of freedom; ICTs applied to Education improve one’s capabilities and empowerment to achieve higher goals; ICTs applied to Politics can lead to better governance. I, for one, believe that people behind the writing and wording of the Sustainable Development Goals are neither stupid, nor ignorant. A thorough reading of the SDGs is inspiring and every statement is perfectly grounded on evidence. But. It’s the approach. It’s industrial. It belongs, in my opinion, to the Industrial Age. It does not, I think, take into account the digital revolution and, more important, the many social revolutions that we have witnessed in recent years. And no, I am not (only) talking about the Arab Spring, or the 15M Spanish Indignados Movement. It’s about the revisiting of the commons and the digital commons; about free software and open educational resources and free hardware and open science and free knowledge; about e-government and open data and open government; about liquid democracy and hybrid democracy and e-participation; about personal learning environments and cMOOCs and communities of learning and communities of practice; about innovation hubs and co-working spaces and open innovation and social innovation and open social innovation; and peer-to-peer whatever and dis-intermediation wherever. Almost nothing about this is in the Sustainable Development Goals, which are to last current until 2030. We are not only ignoring the last 15 years of development, but making them last 15 years more. All in all, the Sustainable Development Goals do not seem to belong to the Information Age. This post originally published at ICT4D Blog as Emancipation and the failure of the Sustainable Development Goals

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Wed, 05 Aug 2015 12:40:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/20150805-emancipation-and-the-failure-of-the-sustainable-development-goals/
Alfabetización digital crítica http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18645 Bebea, I. (2015). Alfabetización digital crítica. Madrid: Ondula.

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Wed, 29 Jul 2015 21:04:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2875
Las cibercomunidades de aprendizaje y la formación del profesorado http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18646 Murua, I. (2015). Las cibercomunidades de aprendizaje y la formación del profesorado. Madrid: UNED.

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Mon, 20 Jul 2015 18:08:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2874
Rosa Borge. From protest to political parties: online deliberation in the new parties arising in Spain http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18642 Notes from the research seminar From protest to political parties: online deliberation in the new parties arising in Spain by Rosa Borge, organized by the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute of the Open University of Catalonia, and held in Barcelona, Spain, on July 20th, 2015. From protest to political parties: online deliberation in the new parties arising in SpainRosa Borge, Eduardo Santamarina What are the deliberative practices of the two mos important parties (Podemos and Barcelona en Comú) that emerged from the 15M Indignados movement in Spain? What trade-offs entail the process of transformation from social movements into political parties? To what extent participation and deliberation could be realized at the same time? Podemos and Barcelona en comú were founded in 2014. Three months after its foundation, Podemos won 5 seats at the European Parliament, and less than a year after its foundation Barcelona en Comú won the mayoralty of Barcelona. Internal organization:

ANyone can easily register online and participate in important decisions. Open particpiatory spaces at the base of the party: assemblies, high degree of independence, etc. Dominant position of the General Assembly or Plenary. Specific consultation or referendum for important decisions: electoral programme, agreements with other parties, etc. Participatory preparation of the electoral programme and organizational documents. Channelling for individual proposals (Plaza Podemos). Revocation of elected positions.

Developed a theoretical framework for measuring online deliberation, after Kies (2010) and Friess & Eilders (2014):

Institutional or structural dimension: technical and structural design of the online platform in order to build a deliberative space: inclusion, asynchronous communication, content visibility, moderation, identification rules, division of labour, relevant information, horizontal interaction, etc. Communicative dimension: deliberative attitude of participants and how the communication process looks like, mainly with relation to the reaction of participants to each other’s ideas: discourse equality, reciprocity, justification, reflexivity, empathy, sincerity, plurality (inclusion). The outcome dimension: results or impact of the deliberation that could be individual or collective (external impact): tolerance, knowledge, efficacy, compromise, preference shift, consensus, legitimacy, impact on political decisions or public debates.

The research analysed the two most voted debates held in the online platform known as Plaza Podemos and the online process of developing the municipal electoral programme of Barcelona en Comú. The three levels (institutional, communicative, outcome) were examined through the deliberative criteria: analysis of the design of the platform and content analysis of the threads of the debates. Plaza Podemos run on an installation of Reddit; while Barcelona en Comú used DemocracyOS for the deliberation, plus Agora Voting to prioritise and vote the final proposals. Main conclusions:

Both online processes were designed to be both participatory and deliberative spaces. This “procedural duality” seems to lean towards the voting side, becoming a kind of competitive space. Tensions between openness and closeness (a typical tension of a party). Extensive experimentation of new democratic processes: learning by doing. Inducement of a “participatory literacy” among citizens. These processes and the internal structure will be subjected to future changes.

The processes maybe were not optimal, but very much aiming at improving democratic processes. Discussion Q: are there facilitators in the platforms? What is their role? Rosa Borge: yes, there are facilitators, which usually do not appear on the front row, and whose role is mainly technical. Q: how can you assure that you are fulfilling anyone’s expectations? Rosa Borge: we do not know by sure, but the overall sense of the community is of high satisfaction with both the platforms and the results. Ivan Serrano: after this research, how do we characterize Podemos or Barcelona en Comú? Are they deliberative parties? Aren’t they? Were do they stand between the extreme of being a traditional party and a fully deliberative one? How can they compare one with each other? Rosa Borge: it is difficult to say after our research, as only a few debates were analysed. But, there is enough evidence to say that these parties look different from other more traditional ones. And yes, there is a tension between pure Habermasian deliberation (which aims at consensus) and the need to participate within the constraints of electoral times. Indeed, the idea of consensus is highly criticised by some authors, and that is why it was not included as an indicator for deliberation: there seems not to be that important that there is an agreement at the end of the process (and just vote instead). Q: how long does it take to become a regular party? Rosa Borge: Everyone is quite surprised with the political success of both Podemos and Barcelona en Comú. What is true is that an initial lack of structures or political organization allows movements to move faster than traditional parties. After that, there is a tension between being operational and being more participative, and the tension is solved with a pendulum movement approaching each side until a balance is reached. Marc Esteve: what about the tension between consensus and voting? Rosa Borge: lately, the priority is to have a decision or a position after the process of participation and/or deliberation. Thus why in most platforms everything can be voted on the go. Yes, it adds a sort of competition unnatural in a deliberative process, but it also allows to have “something” at the end of the process, and to make the process a finite one, one that won’t last forever. This post originally published at ICT4D Blog as Rosa Borge. From protest to political parties: online deliberation in the new parties arising in Spain

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Mon, 20 Jul 2015 03:44:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/20150720-rosa-borge-from-protest-to-political-parties-online-deliberation-in-the-new-parties-arising-in-spain/
OECD Digital Economy Outlook 2015 http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18647 OECD (2015). OECD Digital Economy Outlook 2015. Paris: OECD.

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Fri, 17 Jul 2015 17:50:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2873
Government at a Glance 2015 http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18648 OECD (2015). Government at a Glance 2015. Paris: OECD Publishing.

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Tue, 14 Jul 2015 13:20:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2872
Global Internet Report 2015. Mobile evolution and development of the Internet http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18649 Internet Society (2015). Global Internet Report 2015. Mobile evolution and development of the Internet. Reston: Internet Society.

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Thu, 09 Jul 2015 17:58:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2871
Heutagogy and Lifelong Learning: A Review of Heutagogical Practice and Self-Determined Learning http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18650 Blaschke, L.M. (2012). Heutagogy and Lifelong Learning: A Review of Heutagogical Practice and Self-Determined Learning. Edmonton: Athabasca University.

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Tue, 07 Jul 2015 21:49:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2870
From Andragogy to Heutagogy http://ictlogy.net/lifestream/items/view/18651 Hase, S. and; Kenyon, C. (2000). From Andragogy to Heutagogy. Melbourne: RMIT.

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Tue, 07 Jul 2015 21:41:00 -0700 http://ictlogy.net/bibliography/reports/projects.php?idp=2869